The “Chemical imbalance” theory

What follows is a selection of a selection of a selection of printed media reports on the so-called “chemical imbalance theory”. Almost without exception the word “theory” was not included: … Continue reading The “Chemical imbalance” theory

Hubris and the medical profession

I regularly read the BMJ Rapid Responses and find them to provide opportunities to learn and often to challenge any existing understandings that I may have established. The following response … Continue reading Hubris and the medical profession

“Those three little words”

This perspective in the current BMJ seems important to me. The author, Matt Morgan begins: “If ‘I love you’ are the three most important words in life, then ‘I don’t … Continue reading “Those three little words”

Cut & Paste

Yesterday we went to the “Cut and Paste | 400 Years of Collage” exhibition at the Scottish National Gallery Of Modern Art (Modern Two). Here are some images that I … Continue reading Cut & Paste

Girgenti: footnotes and forget-me-nots

Introducing Girgenti At Girgenti you can still hear two girls sing. Girgenti followed Paestum From Thimble Row to Discoveries:

Discoveries at Gigenti

This is my final film on Girgenti:

Girgenti followed Paestum

It might have been the other way around: Paestum may have followed Girgenti. Nabokov once said that he “did not believe in time”. What follows is Girgenti [in the form … Continue reading Girgenti followed Paestum

Girgenti

Girgenti followed Paestum in a blue sky summer that was not little. Beneath this sky two girls sang. It was a beautiful summer.

Thesis 1389

Thesis 1389, and that of Dr Iain Smith give an account of Girgenti following the death of Captain John Cheape:  

the Captain died

Captain John Cheape died in 1850. Unmarried and with no children, he left Girgenti to six Scottish hospitals. Girgenti was then sold and re-sold. Summer was giving way to autumn.

after the Napoleonic wars

After serving as a Captain in the Napoleonic wars Captain John Cheape “retired” to the Girgenti of his imagination:  

at Girgenti: I heard two girls sing