A collection of films on just about any topic. The name ‘omphalos’ comes from this quote by the Edinburgh writer, Candia McWilliams: Referring to Oxford: “Anyhow, Edinburgh knows that it is the centre of the known world. And wheesht to your omphaloi” . . . “Has a doughnut an omphalos?”

The music from Bagpuss

I was delighted to return home from work yesterday to find that Rachel had bought, on vinyl, The music from Bagpuss! Songs from Bagpuss often feature in my films.

Girgenti: footnotes and forget-me-nots

Introducing Girgenti At Girgenti you can still hear two girls sing. Girgenti followed Paestum From Thimble Row to Discoveries:

Discoveries at Gigenti

This is my final film on Girgenti:

A chance selection of iambic incidents.

This 10 minute film is a muse, based on our short stay in London to meet with Andrew, our son, and to go to Wimbledon. Above the Tate Modern it … Continue reading A chance selection of iambic incidents.

‘Construct Your Own Concrete Capital’

A few photographs from London:

Gently out of time

This was filmed at Huntershall, A68, early morning of Saturday 15th June 2019 on way to Dandie Dinmont: This film is for Richard.

Keepsake

Alexander McCall Smith introducing me to Richard, Duke of Buccleuch at the Borders Book Festival on Saturday 15th June 2019: Alexander McCall Smith had invited me to film the rehearsals … Continue reading Keepsake

Bloody Scotland

Scotland’s International Crime Writing Festival will take place in Stirling between the 20th and 22nd September 2019. Alexander McCall Smith is attending and will be interviewed by Alex Gray:

The forgotten village

Almost nothing of the village of Binn remains. It lives on in memory alone. This film is for Ella Rae. Ella’s voice opens this film. Ella would have loved Ashley … Continue reading The forgotten village

Girgenti followed Paestum

It might have been the other way around: Paestum may have followed Girgenti. Nabokov once said that he “did not believe in time”. What follows is Girgenti [in the form … Continue reading Girgenti followed Paestum

Thesis 1389

Thesis 1389, and that of Dr Iain Smith give an account of Girgenti following the death of Captain John Cheape:  

at Girgenti: I heard two girls sing