How many gateways revisited?

This is a film about Edmonstone house and its designed landscape. It neighbours the Royal Edinburgh Infirmary, Little France.

My understanding is that planning has been approved for 173 homes.

The film ends with the voice of Tom Devine.

Music credit: “the Fresh Monday” by Dexter Britain

A tall, slightly stooping, gaunt figure

Dr Robert Hutchison died in 1960, seven years before I was born. However, his appearance as depicted in the portrait (above) reminds me of Roald Dahl. One of his closest friends and colleagues described him in this way:

Dr Robert Hutchison, like Roald Dahl, is recalled for his wonderful way with language. One of my favourite quotes – about the profession in which we have shared across centuries – is by Hutchison. I still find it extraordinary that he wrote this in 1897:

Robert Hutchison was born at Carlowrie Castle, Kirkliston, in 1871.

In the early 1990s I lived with Sian in Kirkliston, at Humbie farm cottages. I was then studying Landscape Architecture at the University of Aberdeen and Sian was completing her GP training in Livingston:

In 1893 Robert Hutchison graduated in Medicine and Surgery at the University of Edinburgh. Like me, he was a very young medical student, but unlike me he was far more promising.

Robert Hutchison delivered his first baby in 1894 at the Simpson Memorial Hospital Edinburgh. I was born in this same hospital 70 years later.

1897, aged just 26 years of age Robert Hutchison co-authored: Clinical Methods: A Guide to the Practical Study of Medicine:

This is still used and is now in its 23rd Edition!

Robert’s sister Isobel Wylie Hutchison was quite amazing. She was a poet, polyglot, painter, botanist and Arctic traveller. She could speak Italian, Gaelic, Greek, Hebrew, Danish, Icelandic, Greenlandic and some Inuit.  Carlowrie remained a home for her to return to from travels, although the upkeep was hard and the castle did not have electricity until 1951. Isobel died at Carlowrie in 1982, aged 92.

I was delighted to see Dr Robert Hutchison quoted in a recent BMJ response by Dr Amr K H  Gohar. This was in response to this BMJ Analysis:

Dr Gohar titled his response: Primum non nocere (first, do no harm). He summarised the potential harms from early detection which he said may include: overdiagnosis and overtreatment, false positive findings, additional invasive procedures, negative psychosocial consequences, and harmful effects on bodily function.

Dr Gohar confirmed his view [that]: “This does not mean that such early detection should be ignored but it means, as this article stresses, that early detection should be balanced. Critical assessment of early detection including early detection technologies and strategies in clinical practice is indispensable to avoid the persisting bias that early detection is only beneficial.”

This returned my thoughts to communications that I have had with Healthcare Improvement Scotland an NHS Board that is primarily guided by the American organisation: the Institute of Healthcare Improvement.

I have in Hole Ousia expressed my concerns about the approach taken to detection by Healthcare Improvement Scotland. My concerns have related to the lack of consideration of harms of  “National Improvement” drives and the continued marginalisation of consent.

Robert Hutchison may have died seven years before I was born. But in 1897 he wrote words that I consider to be most prescient:

"From inability to let well alone;

from too much zeal for the new and contempt for what is old;

from putting knowledge before wisdom, 
science before art, 
and cleverness before common sense;

from treating patients as cases;

and from making the cure of the disease more grievous than 
the endurance of the same,

Good Lord, deliver us."

 

 

 

 

There was an insistent present tenseness

This film ‘captures’ vintage cars arriving to Bridge of Allan for the rally held on Sunday 14th May 2017 at Strathallan park.

My camera was in two locations: opposite the Westerton and inside the gates of Lecropt Church.

The ‘borrowed words’ come from Iain Banks, William Carlos Williams and Hanya Yanagihara

Music credit: “Century” by Feist from the album ‘Pleasure’

He sees what other people don’t

This film is about Auchenhard (Auchinhard) In West Lothian, Scotland.

A birth place of light.

Music credits: Badly Drawn Boy – “The Shining” and “Piano Theme”

‘Dig the grave and let me lie’

On the early morning of Sunday 7th May 2017, I set off to visit ‘Stank’.

I was looking for the ruined mausoleum to Lord Esher.

The Stank Mausoleum was built in 1925 at the point in this old Roy map where the four sections just happen to meet:

No place could perhaps appear less like it ‘sounds’:

Lord Esher’s Scottish home was at the Roman camp in Callander. Since his death it became a hotel:

It was at this hotel that my grandfather Rab Scott met The Beatles and had a drink with them:

Today, Esher’s Mausoleum is marked this way:

Lord Esher was thought to be the grandson of Napoleon Bonaparte (his mother was thought to be Napoleon’s illegitimate daughter)

Lord Esher was:

Lord Esher was different:

Lord Esher was married with four children but it is considered that he was probably more attracted to his own sex

Lord Esher was respected for the clarity and beauty in his use of language:

Lord Esher’s ruined Mausoleum is on the route to Ben Ledi. Thousands of walkers and mountaineers pass it by each year without knowing.

It was with considerable difficulty that I found it.

Even Hale Bopp found it a struggle to find!

It may be that Lord Esher’s remains, despite his wishes, are not here at Stank?

If that is so, perhaps this is why this mausoleum is sadder than sad.

This was how the Mausoleum appeared at the time of Lord Esher’s death in 1930:

Lord Esher was clearly a great admirer, as I am, of Robert Louis Stevenson.

These inscriptions, of poems by Robert Louis Stevenson, survive by the collapsed doorway to Esher’s Mausoleum:

I needed to visit Stank.

Gardens of the Mind

I have put together this post in my appreciation for Geoffrey Jellicoe (1900 -1996).

Jellicoe was an architect, landscape architect, historian, traveller, lecturer and author. He has been a lasting inspiration for me.

When I studied landscape Architecture at the University of Edinburgh it was Jellicoe who was the guide for my mind’s eye. Without Jellicoe, I feel certain that I would not have gained distinction in all subjects along with the award of the Scottish Chapter prize. I was not a good draughtsman but I had ideas; uncultivated ideas. Six years of training in Medicine (at the University of Aberdeen) had rather stifled my creative and imaginative self and I was altogether rather too tight and rigid. In good part, I feel this a consequence of the unhelpful, and really too strict division between the so-called ‘two cultures’.

In what follows I have “borrowed words” of my betters, taking three quotes from a number of my favourite authors: marginalia and fragments that for me somehow seem to say something about Jellicoe and the ‘two cultures’. Interspersed are a few short clips of Geoffrey Jellicoe talking about draughtsmanship and gardens of the Mind.



 

A ‘mytholm’

Ted Hughes described a ‘mytholm’ as meeting of streams.

This film is about such a meeting. Where the Allan Water goes Forth.

I dedicate this film to my “Grumpa” Rab Scott, Orchardman at Cornton and Drumdruills.

Music Credit “Chasing the sun” by James Ross.

Also big acknowledgement to David Balfour aka Robert Louis Stevenson.