Stone feathers, frozen mid-flight

I recently read this book by Peter Ross:

This is a deeply moving book written by a man who observes much of what most of us fail to see!

I agree with the Guardian review:  “Peter Ross is a wonderfully evocative writer, deftly capturing a sense of place and history, while bringing a deep humanity to his subject. He has written a delightful book.” 

On page 65, Ross shares a visit to the Warriston grave of Nancy with Bob  Reinhardt:

I cried when I read this remembrance shared in such beautiful prose – and my mind returned to the Nancy in oor faimily.  Her story can be read here.


Back in Warriston, Bob Reinhardt took this photograph of Nancy:

Nancy died of a weak heart. In doing so twa hairts: the hairts of her mither and faither, were  broken:

Nancy’s father, William Sinclair Spencer, was an Orcadian born in Stromness. Somehow  [in my mind’s ear] I hear the gentle lilt of his accent as he visited Nancy’s grave and chatted awa’ wi his beautiful daughter.

William Sinclair Spencer trained as a pharmacist:

William Sinclair Spence moved to Edinburgh where he set up shop. His pharmacy was at 18 Joppa Road [seen here underneath the overhanging mortar and pestle sign]. My grandfather, Henry Gordon, spent all his life in Joppa. My grandfather suffered from severe asthma and would have bought his ‘asthma powders’ from Nancy’s faither. Henry, my grandfather, died many years before I was born.

Nancy’s father died in 1969. His, most abbreviated obituary, was published in this journal:

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