To learn from and cherish

In the Scottish Herald on the 1st October 2016:

the-elderly-should-be-valued-and-respected-1-oct-2016-2

reminded us all that:

the-elderly-should-be-valued-and-respected-1-oct-2016-1

and suggested that we:

the-elderly-should-be-valued-and-respected-1-oct-2016-3

Rebecca McQuillan  worried, as I do, that:

the-elderly-should-be-valued-and-respected-1-oct-2016-4

Our treasured NHS and those who educate us might consider:

the-elderly-should-be-valued-and-respected-1-oct-2016-5

As an NHS doctor for those who I value and respect I worry about the promulgation of a reductive language of loss. I often hear our older generation described as a “challenge” and that complex, and unique situations have been reduced to a single word, such as “frailty”, “capacity” and “delirium”. Language evolved over tens of millennia to avoid such simplification.

Rebecca McQuillan closes beautifully:

the-elderly-should-be-valued-and-respected-1-oct-2016-6

I shared this post with the British Medical Journal. There was 
an interesting reaction on social media to my post and to those made 
by others by the original columnist:

"some truly bizarre responses to what was a mainstream common 
on acute frailty"

"I am thinking of changing my BMJ column from 'acute perspective' 
to 'everybody must get Stoned'"

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