To learn from and cherish

In the Scottish Herald on the 1st October 2016:the-elderly-should-be-valued-and-respected-1-oct-2016-2reminded us all that:

the-elderly-should-be-valued-and-respected-1-oct-2016-1

and suggested that we:

the-elderly-should-be-valued-and-respected-1-oct-2016-3

Rebecca McQuillan  worried, as I do, that:

the-elderly-should-be-valued-and-respected-1-oct-2016-4

Our treasured NHS and those who educate us might consider:

the-elderly-should-be-valued-and-respected-1-oct-2016-5As an NHS doctor there for those who I value and respect I worry about the promulgation of a reductive language of loss. I often hear our older generation described as a “challenge” and that complex, and unique situations have been reduced to a single word, such as “frailty”, “capacity” and “delirium”. Language evolved over tens of millennia to avoid such over-simplification.

Rebecca McQuillan closes beautifully:

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I shared this post with the British Medical Journal. There was 
an interesting reaction on social media to my post and to those made 
by others by Professor David Oliver, the original columnist:

"some truly bizarre responses to what was a mainstream common 
on acute frailty"

"I am thinking of changing my BMJ column from 'acute perspective' 
to 'everybody must get Stoned'"

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