The Scottish Public: consulted on a Sunshine Act

The Scottish public were consulted on the need for a Sunshine Act for Scotland. Their response, in majority, was that this was necessary.

Almost a year-and-a-half on and the Scottish Government has provided no update to the Scottish people. This is disappointing given the Scottish Government’s assertion that “everyone matters” to them.

The lack of sunshine legislation in the British Isles is raised in this current BMJ News feature:

This response was submitted by Vagish Kumar L Shanbhag:

Psychiatry without borders

This week the International Congress for the Royal College of Psychiatrists is taking place in Edinburgh. It is titled “Psychiatry without Borders”.

Given my concerns about the harms associated with over-medicalisation I decided to make a peaceful protest outside.

I was born in Edinburgh in 1967.

This was a home-made protest.

I have no associations with Critical Psychiatry, Anti-Psychiatry, Scientologists, the Citizens Commission on Human Rights.

I am simply a doctor who is interested in ethics.

I am of the view that critical thinking is an essential part of science.

I understand that biases come in all forms. However there is longstanding evidence that exposure to industry promotional activity can lead to doctors recommending worse treatments for patients.

Thank you to all who came to talk to me on the day. Particular thanks to Chrys Muirhead and her son Daniel for all their support

I waited the full day as I wanted to meet the Cabinet Minister for Health (Scottish Government) outside the International Congress. This was my experience:

More details about a Sunshine Act for Scotland can be found here and here.

The public consultation can be found here.

 

“The Law of the Few”

Malcolm Gladwell in his book ‘The Tipping Point’ describes what he terms “The Law of the Few”: namely that the influence of a few people can result in change in behaviour across a wider population.

This Hole Ousia post is about the education of psychiatrists and takes all its material from publically available sources. This post hopes to demonstrate the considerable reach (to the many) of a handful of educators.

This post follows on from the evidence that was gathered for my petition to the Scottish Parliament to consider introducing a Sunshine Act for Scotland. That petition closed 16 months ago following a consultation with the Scottish public who, in majority, asked that payments made to healthcare workers and academics be declared on a mandatory basis. I have argued the reasons why I am of the view that such mandatory declarations should be registered on a single, open, central, searchable, independent database.

Evidence has demonstrated that when a doctor has a financial “conflict of interest”, this can affect the treatment decisions they make, or recommend. There is longstanding evidence that exposure to industry promotional activity can lead to doctors recommending worse treatments for patients.

The post has come about following my invitations in the last month to Continuing Medical Education (CME) provided in my place of employment (NHS Scotland). I do not knowingly  attend sponsored medical education and so declined these two talks. The first was by Dr Peter Haddad (sponsored by Lundbeck) and the next one, just two weeks later, was by Professor McAllister Williams (sponsored by Lundbeck).

I am an ordinary psychiatrist working in a provincial NHS general hospital and to find such prominent individuals visiting our wee corner of Scotland left me to reflect upon the wide influence of a few key individuals.


The British Association for Psychopharmacology (BAP) describes itself as “a learned society and registered charity. It promotes research and education in Psychopharmacology and related areas, and brings together people in academia, health services, and industry.”

Professor Hamish McAllister-Williams is an Ex-Officio Member of BAP and is currently the BAP Director of Education.  Dr Peter Haddad, former Honorary General Secretary of BAP, has been involved over a number of years with BAP education providing articles and masterclasses.

Over the course of my career as a psychiatrist I have frequently heard colleagues say that BAP “is the place to go” for CME.  It is now a requirement for General Medical Council Appraisal and Revalidation to demonstrate with our College that we have participated in CME. Once this has been demonstrated the Royal College of Psychiatrists will issue a Certificate of “Good medical standing”.

As BAP Director of Education, Professor McAllister Williams recently shared this offer to trainee psychiatrists. Following the dissemination of this I took the opportunity to look more closely at the current BAP calendar for Continuing Medical Education. This again demonstrates the wide influence of a small number of individuals, some of whom would appear (within the limits of the current voluntary disclosure regime) to have potential financial conflicts of interest.

In the remaining part of this post I have included a few examples

As BAP Director of Education, Professor McAllister Williams chaired this BAP 2015 Summer Meeting: “Expert Seminar in Psychopharmacology”. The key-note speaker was Professor Stephen Stahl who many consider as one of the most influential key opinion leaders in world psychiatry.

In the USA, pharmaceutical and medical device companies are required by law to release details of their payments to doctors and teaching hospitals for promotional talks, research and consulting. This was the return for Professor Stahl at the time of his contribution to BAP as an educator of UK psychiatrists:

In the UK disclosure of payments is on a voluntary basis.

Professor David Nutt, former BAP President, has declared financial interests on the voluntary ABPI Register. Over the ABPI “disclosure period”, Professor Nutt has declared just short of £46,000 that he has received from Janssen-Cilag Ltd and Lundbeck Ltd.

There are strong links between BAP and the Royal College of Psychiatrists. The President Elect for BAP is Professor Allan Young.  Professor Allan Young is Chair of the Psychopharmacology Committee of the Royal College of Psychiatrists. Dr McAllister Williams, the BAP Director of Education is an appointed member of this Committee. Some years ago I wrote this post about the Royal College of Psychiatrists Psychopharmacology Committee.

Some years ago I put together this Hole Ousia post on Professor Allan Young and also this post. It is clear that Professor Allan Young remains a very active educator and opinion leader in the UK and beyond:

Professor Guy Goodwin was President of BAP between 2004 and 2005. In April 2014 he featured prominently on  BBC Panorama:

On the 40th anniversary of BAP, Professor Peter J Cowen was given the Lifetime Achievement award:

Professor Philip J Cowen featured in this post of Hole Ousia of some years back: All in the past? Well no. Definitely not.

Conclusion:
The recently retired CEO of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, Vanessa Cameron, who had been with the College for 36 years was interviewed for the Psychiatric Bulletin in December 2016. This was the view that she expressed:

Each time I reconsider this subject I do not find evidence to support this view. My worry is that the Royal College of Psychiatrists is being complacent in facilitating the education of the many by such a small group of individuals. The Law of the Few.

Footnote:

If you click on each invite below you will access what is available 
in the public domain regarding the educational activities of the 
recent speakers. I apologise if this is in any way an incomplete 
record.

 

To root in these very specific places

T S Eliot rooted poems about ideas in very specific places. He was very interested in yew trees:


The following film is on the Fortingall Yew.

Time passes. Listen.

Gavin Francis: ‘incorrigibly plural’

Volume 11, Number 4 of the Scottish Review of Books carried my interest throughout. The interview with Gavin Francis was one of a number of highlights.

At a recent medical conference in Stirling, Gavin Francis introduced himself to Peter and Sian. This made our day.

“Empire Antarctica” by Gavin Francis rightly won the 2013, Scottish Book of the Year. It has wowed all who have read it. Here is an omphpatyp of some of what wowed me.

Gavin Francis in SRB 2016 (9) Gavin Francis in SRBsrb-review-of-serious-sweet-3Gavin Francis (1) Gavin Francis (2) Gavin Francis (3) Gavin Francis (4) Gavin Francis (5) Gavin Francis (6) Gavin Francis (7) Gavin Francis (8) Gavin Francis (9) Gavin Francis (10) Gavin Francis (11) Gavin Francis (12) Gavin Francis (13) Gavin Francis (14) Gavin Francis (15) Gavin Francis (16) Gavin Francis (17) Gavin Francis (18) Gavin Francis (19) Gavin Francis (20) Gavin Francis (21) Gavin Francis (22) Gavin Francis (23) Gavin Francis (24) Gavin Francis (25) Gavin Francis (26) Gavin Francis (27) Gavin Francis (28) Gavin Francis (29) Gavin Francis (30) Gavin Francis (31) Gavin Francis (32) Gavin Francis (33) Gavin Francis (34) Gavin Francis (35) Gavin Francis (36) Gavin Francis (37) Gavin Francis (38) Gavin Francis (39) Gavin Francis (40) Gavin Francis (41) Gavin Francis (42) Gavin Francis (43) Gavin Francis (44) Gavin Francis (45) Gavin Francis (46) Gavin Francis (47) Gavin Francis (48) Gavin Francis (49) Gavin Francis (50) Gavin Francis (51) Gavin Francis (52) Gavin Francis (53) Gavin Francis (54) Gavin Francis (55) Gavin Francis (56) Gavin Francis (57) Gavin Francis (58) Gavin Francis (59) Gavin Francis (60) Gavin Francis (61) Gavin Francis (62) Gavin Francis (63) Gavin Francis (64) Gavin Francis (65) Gavin Francis (66) Gavin Francis (67) Gavin Francis (68) Gavin Francis (69) Gavin Francis (70) Gavin Francis (71) Gavin Francis (72) Gavin Francis (73) Gavin Francis (74) Gavin Francis (75) Gavin Francis (76) Gavin Francis (77) Gavin Francis (78) Gavin Francis (79) Gavin Francis (80) Gavin Francis (81) Gavin Francis (82) Gavin Francis (83) Gavin Francis (84) Gavin Francis (85) Gavin Francis (86) Gavin Francis (87) Gavin Francis (88) Gavin Francis (89) Gavin Francis (90) Gavin Francis (91) Gavin Francis (92) Gavin Francis (93) Gavin Francis (94) Gavin Francis (95) Gavin Francis (96) Gavin Francis (97) Gavin Francis (98) Gavin Francis (99) Gavin Francis (100) Gavin Francis (101) Gavin Francis (102) Gavin Francis (103) Gavin Francis (104) Gavin Francis (105) Gavin Francis (106) Gavin Francis (107) Gavin Francis (108) Gavin Francis (109) Gavin Francis (110) Gavin Francis (111) Gavin Francis (112) Gavin Francis (113) Gavin Francis (114) Gavin Francis (115)

NHS Forth Valley – unable to offer reassurance

There were a number of reasons why I left NHS Forth Valley. One of those reasons was a concern that patients, often elderly, were being harmed through the misdiagnosis of dementia.

Shortly after I left I wrote to senior management seeking the following reassurance:

  • that any patients that have been harmed are acknowledged and where appropriate supported in coming to terms with their mis-diagnosis,
  • that practice in NHS Forth Valley now follows Scottish, UK and International guidelines on Dementia.
  • that NHS Forth Valley has, as an organisation, reflected on this matter

Following a reminder I received a reply suggesting that examining comparative data would be helpful but would take some time:

Tracey Gillies 23-Feb-2015

Following another reminder I have now received what I take to be the final position of NHS Forth Valley on the matter. My understanding of this is that NHS Forth Valley cannot provide the reassurance that I was seeking:

Tracey Gillies 16-Mar-2016

Tracey Gillies 16-Mar-2016 Glasgow Declaration

I have sent the following letter to NHS Forth Valley which reiterates my ongoing concerns:

"I remain concerned about the potential for harm relating to the 
over-diagnosis of dementia. I understand that you are not in a 
position to reassure me on this in terms of patients referred to 
NHS Forth Valley. I would welcome it if this “could potentially be 
explored in the future.” 

I note and understand your general comments about reflection. 
The book “Intelligent Kindness”  considers the importance of reflection 
not just at an individual level but also at an organisational one.

I feel that it is now time to conclude our correspondence on this 
matter."

If anybody would wish to see the full context of the letters please contact me.

 

 

 

What you need to know

1 in 7 Scots are on an antidepressant. Some Scottish academics have argued that this is “appropriate prescribing” for “recurrent” and “chronic” conditions.

Antipsychotic prescribing, in all age-groups, has risen year-on-year since the Scottish Government started measuring such prescribing. Last week NHS Scotland was struggling to source one such antipsychotic, namely haloperidol. Intramuscular haloperidol may not be available for 14 months. I do not know if this is a supply or demand issue, however this medication is being most extensively used in NHS hospitals in Scotland despite generally being prescribed “off-label”.

With this in mind I present a pattern that emerged from reading the current British Medical Journal alongside my weekend newspapers.  Here is what they both suggested that “you need to know”:

All the other children are on it, 21 Nov 2015, Guardian Andrew Lansley, Roche 20 Nov 2013 Disney and McDonald's staple, 21 Nov 2015, Guardian Generation meds, 21 Nov 2015, Guardian Long term effects on oor children, Guardian, 21 Nov 2015 Now you are my friend, Nov 21, 2015, Guardian Pharmacological mission creep, BMJ, 20 Nov 2015 What you need to know, Bmj, 21 Nov 2015

Update, 5th October 2016. The following was published on the 
front page of the Scotsman newspaper: 

"Mental health prescriptions hit ten-year high"

prescriptions-for-mental-health-drugs-10-year-high-nhs-scotland-2016-a prescriptions-for-mental-health-drugs-10-year-high-nhs-scotland-2016-b

The figures are from the Scottish Government and can be accessed here.

A letter to Professor Jason Leitch

Image

In this post I reply to Professor Jason Leitch, whose letter of the 2nd June 2015 on Haloperidol prescribing to Scotland’s elderly can be read here:

Jason Leitch Delirium

This is the link to my summary on Delirium Screening written March 2014 at the request of one of those involved with improvement work in delirium. I shared this with Healthcare Improvement Scotland, the Scottish Delirium Association and OPAC (Older People in Acute Care Improvement programme). I had no replies.

Recently this automated e-mail arrived:

Jason Leitch, unread letter deleted

I thus contacted Professor Leitch to clarify. This is the response I received:

e-mail: 25 September 2015 

Dr Gordon, I can assure you that not only did I receive and read 
your email of 8th June, I still have it. I noted its content and 
following our earlier correspondence didn’t feel it required a 
response. I also read our correspondence which you published 
on your blog. 

Professor Jason Leitch, National Clinical Director.

The following behind-the-scene communications were recently released as a result of a Data protection request. The communications indicate a tone of disdain for those who may write regularly to DG Health and Social care.

director-general-of-nhs-scotland-e-mail-to-jason-leitch-national-clinical-director-who-is-not-registered-with-the-gmc

I had asked if Professor Jason Leitch might confirm if he is registered with the General Medical Council. Again there is clear evidence of a most disparaging tone made by two of the most senior figures in the DG Health and Social care. One has to worry for other correspondents who write with legitimate concerns about patient wellbeing and safety.

communications-between-deputy-director-nhs-scotland-and-national-clinical-director-25-sept-2016

Professor Leitch chose not to answer my question about registration with the General Medical Council however he did kindly supply a most abbreviated CV which would indicate that he is not medically trained and qualified. Professor Leitch’s qualifications are in Dentistry and he is registered with the General Dental Council. This is important in that Professor Leitch gives advice as National Clinical Director for NHS Scotland yet he is governed by a regulatory body that is not for general medicine.

national-clinical-director-and-director-general-25-sept-2016

 

Update, 5th October 2016. The following was published on the 
front page of the Scotsman newspaper: 

"Mental health prescriptions hit ten-year high"

prescriptions-for-mental-health-drugs-10-year-high-nhs-scotland-2016-a prescriptions-for-mental-health-drugs-10-year-high-nhs-scotland-2016-b

The figures are from the Scottish Government and can be accessed here.

Haloperidol prescribing to Scotland’s elders

In a previous post the FOI returns on Haloperidol prescribing in NHS Scotland were shared.  This followed on from my consideration of a BMJ report regarding the scale and potential harms of  such “off-label” prescribing to our elderly in hospital.

Since that time I have had a response from Professor Jason Leitch, National Clinical Director, Healthcare Quality, Scottish Government:

Letter from Prof Leitch

Today I have sent this reply to Professor Leitch:

To: Professor J. Leitch,
National Clinical Director, Healthcare Quality,
Healthcare Quality and Strategy Directorate
Planning and Quality Division
St Andrew’s House,
Regent Road,
Edinburgh EH1 3DG

8th June 2015

Dear Professor Leitch,
I was most grateful to receive your letter of reply dated 2nd June 2015.

I thought it best to reply to you to clarify the focus of my concerns. I wish to try and keep my reply short and focussed on the points you raise.

Point ONE:
You state that the Scottish Clinical Advisor for Dementia informed you that the “off-label use of Haloperidol for dementia is not especially unusual”. This would seem to diverge from  this BMJ change page made by NHS England’s National Clinical Director for Dementia, Professor Alastair Burns (I attach the full paper)

Dont use

You cite SIGN 86 guidelines on Dementia. These guidelines were issued 9 years ago when it was stated that “they will be considered for review in three years.” SIGN 86 is specifically for dementia and not delirium. The SIGN website indicates that there is no current plan to update SIGN 86 nor to introduce a Guideline on Delirium:

SIGN 86 was criticised in this research: Knűppel H, Mertz M, Schmidhuber M, Neitzke G, Strech D (2013) Inclusion of Ethical Issues in Dementia Guidelines: A Thematic Text Analysis. PLoS Med 10(8): e1001498. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001498. I find it disappointing that an outdated and flawed guideline is still the basis for prescribing in dementia.

Ethical issues

Point TWO:
Haloperidol prescribing is part of the “Comprehensive Delirium pathway” introduced across NHS Scotland by the Scottish Delirium Association (SDA) and Healthcare Improvement Scotland (OPAC). You will be aware of this as I note that you are giving the key-note talk this week at the conference: Transforming delirium care in the real world”. Over a year ago the Secretary of the Scottish Delirium Association asked me to summarise my views on delirium improvements happening in Scotland. I did so and shared these with the SDA and with OPAC. I am disappointed to note that no reply has been forthcoming. I attach this summary for you with this letter.

Transforming delirium care in the real world

Conclusion:
It is welcome to hear that the Scottish Government are taking actions here. It is the case, by Scottish Government figures, that antipsychotic prescribing is increasing year-on-year in NHS Scotland. I seek improved care for individuals with delirium and dementia. I am concerned that current approaches, along with staff shortages and increased demands on staff time, are making it more rather than less likely that our elders may receive antipsychotic medication that can result in significant harms.

Yours sincerely,
Dr Peter J. Gordon

Included with letter:

Update, 5th October 2016. The following was published on the 
front page of the Scotsman newspaper: 

"Mental health prescriptions hit ten-year high"

prescriptions-for-mental-health-drugs-10-year-high-nhs-scotland-2016-a prescriptions-for-mental-health-drugs-10-year-high-nhs-scotland-2016-b

The figures are from the Scottish Government and can be accessed here.

“In pursuit of marketing approval” [antidepressants for anxiety]

This is a report in the current BMJ:  Publication bias01This was the result of the pursuit of the market:Publication bias02The US Food and Drug Administration failed to ensure scientific objectivity:Publication bias03Robert K Merton would weep at this.

Update, 5th October 2016. The following was published on the 
front page of the Scotsman newspaper: 

"Mental health prescriptions hit ten-year high"

prescriptions-for-mental-health-drugs-10-year-high-nhs-scotland-2016-a prescriptions-for-mental-health-drugs-10-year-high-nhs-scotland-2016-b

The figures are from the Scottish Government and can be accessed here.