Rising stars: British Association of Psychopharmacology

I submitted a rapid response to the BMJ last September after viewing galleries of photographs of the British Association of Psychopharmacology (BAP) Summer Meeting of 2016. The BMJ did not publish my post. This year’s galleries of the British Association of Psychopharmacology (BAP) Summer Meeting have now been shared. This is an amended version of what I sent last summer:

I was recently shared the published photographs of the British Association of Psychopharmacology 2016 Summer Conference.

At this BAP conference, an accredited CPD conference, the rising stars are seen to mix with today’s key opinion leaders. We all welcome the sharing of experience between generations and I have repeatedly stated how important I believe this to be. Some of the BAP key opinion leaders have declared significant financial interests with the Pharmaceutical Industry.

Up-to-date declarations of BAP speakers can be viewed here

I support transparency.  I have understood that this can only ever be a means to an end.

Robert K Merton once insisted that science should be based not on interest but ‘disinterest’. Merton’s star rose long ago and he is now dead. I do hope that all generations of scientists might be able to see his ‘disinterested’ star, still in the sky that we all share.

 

“Doing damage in delirium the hazards of antipsychotic treatment in elderly people”

This paper was published in the Lancet in late last year. It is a two page article that is worth reading in full. All screenshots below are from this paper:001

The authors commented that002

The authors were of the view that003

Scottish Government figures confirm that prescribing of antipsychotics is rising in our elderly. It thus seems important to consider why this may be. The authors continue:004

There is always the risk in times of austerity, and when staffing levels are not ideal, that:005

The authors state:006

The promotion of off-label use of antipsychotic medication was instrumental in my petition to the Scottish parliament for a Sunshine Act:007

The authors continue:

008

But what does the evidence have to say? The authors state:009

The authors continue:011

The authors ask:012

The authors conclude with Dr William Osler:013

I am also of the view that there is a risk that “brief screening tools” may result in “pathways” being followed that, despite good intentions, lead to greater prescribing of antipsychotics in our elderly. I am aware that currently “brief screening tools” are being promoted in Scottish NHS hospitals.

I wish to conclude with one recent example of many: an elderly woman, with terminal cancer returned to her GP after a recent period in hospital. She asked her GP “But why am I on this anti-schizophrenic drug?”

Update, 5th October 2016. The following was published on the 
front page of the Scotsman newspaper: 

"Mental health prescriptions hit ten-year high"

prescriptions-for-mental-health-drugs-10-year-high-nhs-scotland-2016-a prescriptions-for-mental-health-drugs-10-year-high-nhs-scotland-2016-b

The figures are from the Scottish Government and can be accessed here.